draft-ietf-softwire-mesh-multicast-10.txt   draft-ietf-softwire-mesh-multicast-11.txt 
Network Working Group M. Xu Network Working Group M. Xu
Internet-Draft Y. Cui Internet-Draft Y. Cui
Expires: February 5, 2016 J. Wu Expires: August 7, 2016 J. Wu
S. Yang S. Yang
Tsinghua University Tsinghua University
C. Metz C. Metz
G. Shepherd G. Shepherd
Cisco Systems Cisco Systems
August 4, 2015 February 4, 2016
Softwire Mesh Multicast Softwire Mesh Multicast
draft-ietf-softwire-mesh-multicast-10 draft-ietf-softwire-mesh-multicast-11
Abstract Abstract
The Internet needs to support IPv4 and IPv6 packets. Both address The Internet needs to support IPv4 and IPv6 packets. Both address
families and their related protocol suites support multicast of the families and their related protocol suites support multicast of the
single-source and any-source varieties. During IPv6 transition, single-source and any-source varieties. During IPv6 transition,
there will be scenarios where a backbone network running one IP there will be scenarios where a backbone network running one IP
address family internally (referred to as internal IP or I-IP) will address family internally (referred to as internal IP or I-IP) will
provide transit services to attached client networks running another provide transit services to attached client networks running another
IP address family (referred to as external IP or E-IP). It is IP address family (referred to as external IP or E-IP). It is
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on February 5, 2016. This Internet-Draft will expire on August 7, 2016.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must
include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
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7. Data Plane Functions of AFBR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 7. Data Plane Functions of AFBR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
7.1. Process and Forward Multicast Data . . . . . . . . . . . 17 7.1. Process and Forward Multicast Data . . . . . . . . . . . 17
7.2. Selecting a Tunneling Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 7.2. Selecting a Tunneling Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
7.3. TTL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 7.3. TTL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
7.4. Fragmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 7.4. Fragmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
8. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 8. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
9. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 9. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 10. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
10.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 10.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
10.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 10.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Appendix A. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Appendix A. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
The Internet needs to support IPv4 and IPv6 packets. Both address The Internet needs to support IPv4 and IPv6 packets. Both address
families and their related protocol suites support multicast of the families and their related protocol suites support multicast of the
single-source and any-source varieties. During IPv6 transition, single-source and any-source varieties. During IPv6 transition,
there will be scenarios where a backbone network running one IP there will be scenarios where a backbone network running one IP
address family internally (referred to as internal IP or I-IP) will address family internally (referred to as internal IP or I-IP) will
provide transit services to attached client networks running another provide transit services to attached client networks running another
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7.4. Fragmentation 7.4. Fragmentation
The encapsulation performed by upstream AFBR will increase the size The encapsulation performed by upstream AFBR will increase the size
of packets. As a result, the outgoing I-IP link MTU may not of packets. As a result, the outgoing I-IP link MTU may not
accommodate the extra size. As it's not always possible for core accommodate the extra size. As it's not always possible for core
operators to increase the MTU of every link. Fragmentation and operators to increase the MTU of every link. Fragmentation and
reassembling of encapsulated packets MUST be supported by AFBRs. reassembling of encapsulated packets MUST be supported by AFBRs.
8. Security Considerations 8. Security Considerations
The AFBR routers could maintain secure communications within Security Some schemes will cause heavy burden on routers, which can be used by
Architecture for the Internet Protocol as described in [RFC4301] . To attackers as a tool when they carry out DDoS attack. Compared with
protect against unwanted forged PIM protocol messages, the PIM [RFC4925] , the security concerns should be more carefully
messages can be authenticated using IPsec as described in [RFC4601] . considered. The attackers can set up many multicast trees in the
edge networks, causing too many multicast states in the core network.
But some schemes, which will cause heavy burden on routers, may be Besides, this document does not introduce any new security concern in
used by attackers as a tool when they carry out DDoS attack. addition to what is discussed in [RFC4925] and [RFC4601].
Compared with [RFC4301] , the security concerns should be more
carefully considered. The attackers can set up many multicast trees
in the edge networks, causing too many multicast states in the core
network.
9. IANA Considerations 9. IANA Considerations
When AFBRs perform address mapping, they should follow some When AFBRs perform address mapping, they should follow some
predefined rules, especially the IPv6 prefix for source address predefined rules, especially the IPv6 prefix for source address
mapping should be predefined, such that ingress AFBRs and egress mapping should be predefined, such that ingress AFBRs and egress
AFBRs can complete the mapping procedure correctly. The IPv6 prefix AFBRs can complete the mapping procedure correctly. The IPv6 prefix
for translation can be unified within only the transit core, or for translation can be unified within only the transit core, or
within global area. In the later condition, the prefix should be within global area. In the later condition, the prefix should be
assigned by IANA. assigned by IANA.
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