draft-ietf-masque-connect-udp-07.txt   draft-ietf-masque-connect-udp-08.txt 
MASQUE D. Schinazi MASQUE D. Schinazi
Internet-Draft Google LLC Internet-Draft Google LLC
Intended status: Standards Track 5 March 2022 Intended status: Standards Track 21 March 2022
Expires: 6 September 2022 Expires: 22 September 2022
UDP Proxying Support for HTTP UDP Proxying Support for HTTP
draft-ietf-masque-connect-udp-07 draft-ietf-masque-connect-udp-08
Abstract Abstract
This document describes how to proxy UDP over HTTP. Similar to how This document describes how to proxy UDP over HTTP. Similar to how
the CONNECT method allows proxying TCP over HTTP, this document the CONNECT method allows proxying TCP over HTTP, this document
defines a new mechanism to proxy UDP. It is built using HTTP defines a new mechanism to proxy UDP. It is built using HTTP
Extended CONNECT. Extended CONNECT.
Discussion Venues Discussion Venues
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on 6 September 2022. This Internet-Draft will expire on 22 September 2022.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2022 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2022 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents (https://trustee.ietf.org/ Provisions Relating to IETF Documents (https://trustee.ietf.org/
license-info) in effect on the date of publication of this document. license-info) in effect on the date of publication of this document.
Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights
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Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.1. Conventions and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1. Conventions and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. Configuration of Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. Configuration of Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3. HTTP Exchanges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3. HTTP Exchanges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.1. Proxy Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3.1. Proxy Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.2. HTTP Request over HTTP/1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.2. HTTP Request over HTTP/1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.3. HTTP Response over HTTP/1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.3. HTTP Response over HTTP/1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3.4. HTTP Request over HTTP/2 and HTTP/3 . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.4. HTTP Request over HTTP/2 and HTTP/3 . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.5. HTTP Response over HTTP/2 and HTTP/3 . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.5. HTTP Response over HTTP/2 and HTTP/3 . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.6. Note About Draft Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.6. Note About Draft Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
4. Context Identifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4. Context Identifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
5. HTTP Datagram Payload Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5. HTTP Datagram Payload Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
6. Performance Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 6. Performance Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
6.1. MTU Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 6.1. MTU Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
6.2. Tunneling of ECN Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 6.2. Tunneling of ECN Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
7. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 7. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
8. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 8. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
8.1. HTTP Upgrade Token . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 8.1. HTTP Upgrade Token . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 8.2. Well-Known URI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Appendix A. Example Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
A.1. Registering Contexts with Headers . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
A.2. Registering Contexts with Capsules . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Author's Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
This document describes how to proxy UDP over HTTP. Similar to how This document describes how to proxy UDP over HTTP. Similar to how
the CONNECT method (see Section 9.3.6 of [HTTP]) allows proxying TCP the CONNECT method (see Section 9.3.6 of [HTTP]) allows proxying TCP
[TCP] over HTTP, this document defines a new mechanism to proxy UDP [TCP] over HTTP, this document defines a new mechanism to proxy UDP
[UDP]. [UDP].
UDP Proxying supports all versions of HTTP and uses HTTP Datagrams UDP Proxying supports all versions of HTTP and uses HTTP Datagrams
[HTTP-DGRAM]. When using HTTP/2 or HTTP/3, UDP proxying uses HTTP [HTTP-DGRAM]. When using HTTP/2 or HTTP/3, UDP proxying uses HTTP
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[HTTP]) between the client and the proxy, those are referred to as [HTTP]) between the client and the proxy, those are referred to as
"intermediaries" in this document. "intermediaries" in this document.
Note that, when the HTTP version in use does not support multiplexing Note that, when the HTTP version in use does not support multiplexing
streams (such as HTTP/1.1), any reference to "stream" in this streams (such as HTTP/1.1), any reference to "stream" in this
document represents the entire connection. document represents the entire connection.
2. Configuration of Clients 2. Configuration of Clients
Clients are configured to use UDP Proxying over HTTP via an URI Clients are configured to use UDP Proxying over HTTP via an URI
Template [TEMPLATE]. The URI template MUST contain exactly two Template [TEMPLATE] with the variables "target_host" and
variables: "target_host" and "target_port". Examples are shown "target_port". Examples are shown below:
below:
https://masque.example.org/{target_host}/{target_port}/ https://masque.example.org/.well-known/masque/udp/{target_host}/{target_port}/
https://proxy.example.org:4443/masque?h={target_host}&p={target_port} https://proxy.example.org:4443/masque?h={target_host}&p={target_port}
https://proxy.example.org:4443/masque{?target_host,target_port} https://proxy.example.org:4443/masque{?target_host,target_port}
Figure 1: URI Template Examples Figure 1: URI Template Examples
The URI template MUST be a level 3 template or lower. The URI
template MUST be in absolute form, and MUST include non-empty scheme,
authority and path components. The path component of the URI
template MUST start with a slash "/". All template variables MUST be
within the path component of the URI. The URI template MUST contain
the two variables "target_host" and "target_port" and MAY contain
other variables. The URI template MUST NOT contain any non-ASCII
unicode characters and MUST only contain ASCII characters in the
range 0x21-0x7E inclusive (note that percent-encoding is allowed).
The URI template MUST NOT use Reserved Expansion ("+" operator),
Fragment Expansion ("#" operator), Label Expansion with Dot-Prefix,
Path Segment Expansion with Slash-Prefix, nor Path-Style Parameter
Expansion with Semicolon-Prefix. If any of the requirements above
are not met by a URI template, the client MUST reject its
configuration and fail the request without sending it to the proxy.
Since the original HTTP CONNECT method allowed conveying the target Since the original HTTP CONNECT method allowed conveying the target
host and port but not the scheme, proxy authority, path, nor query, host and port but not the scheme, proxy authority, path, nor query,
there exist proxy configuration interfaces that only allow the user there exist proxy configuration interfaces that only allow the user
to configure the proxy host and the proxy port. Client to configure the proxy host and the proxy port. Client
implementations of this specification that are constrained by such implementations of this specification that are constrained by such
limitations MUST use the default template which is defined as: limitations MUST use the default template which is defined as:
"https://$PROXY_HOST:$PROXY_PORT/{target_host}/{target_port}/" where "https://$PROXY_HOST:$PROXY_PORT/.well-known/masque/
$PROXY_HOST and $PROXY_PORT are the configured host and port of the udp/{target_host}/{target_port}/" where $PROXY_HOST and $PROXY_PORT
proxy respectively. Proxy deployments SHOULD use the default are the configured host and port of the proxy respectively. Proxy
template to facilitate interoperability with such clients. deployments SHOULD use the default template to facilitate
interoperability with such clients.
3. HTTP Exchanges 3. HTTP Exchanges
This document defines the "connect-udp" HTTP Upgrade Token. "connect- This document defines the "connect-udp" HTTP Upgrade Token. "connect-
udp" uses the Capsule Protocol as defined in [HTTP-DGRAM]. udp" uses the Capsule Protocol as defined in [HTTP-DGRAM].
A "connect-udp" request requests that the recipient proxy establish a A "connect-udp" request requests that the recipient proxy establish a
tunnel over a single HTTP stream to the destination target identified tunnel over a single HTTP stream to the destination target identified
by the "target_host" and "target_port" variables of the URI template by the "target_host" and "target_port" variables of the URI template
(see Section 2). If the request is successful, the proxy commits to (see Section 2). If the request is successful, the proxy commits to
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Proxies MUST NOT introduce fragmentation at the IP layer when Proxies MUST NOT introduce fragmentation at the IP layer when
forwarding HTTP Datagrams onto a UDP socket. In IPv4, the Don't forwarding HTTP Datagrams onto a UDP socket. In IPv4, the Don't
Fragment (DF) bit MUST be set if possible, to prevent fragmentation Fragment (DF) bit MUST be set if possible, to prevent fragmentation
on the path. Future extensions MAY remove these requirements. on the path. Future extensions MAY remove these requirements.
3.2. HTTP Request over HTTP/1.1 3.2. HTTP Request over HTTP/1.1
When using HTTP/1.1, a UDP proxying request will meet the following When using HTTP/1.1, a UDP proxying request will meet the following
requirements: requirements:
* the method SHALL be "CONNECT". * the method SHALL be "GET".
* the request-target SHALL use absolute-form (see Section 3.2.2 of * the request-target SHALL use absolute-form (see Section 3.2.2 of
[H1]). [H1]).
* the request SHALL include a single Host header containing the * the request SHALL include a single Host header containing the
origin of the proxy. origin of the proxy.
* the request SHALL include a single "Connection" header with value * the request SHALL include a single "Connection" header with value
"Upgrade". "Upgrade".
* the request SHALL include a single "Upgrade" header with value * the request SHALL include a single "Upgrade" header with value
"connect-udp". "connect-udp".
For example, if the client is configured with URI template For example, if the client is configured with URI template
"https://proxy.example.org/{target_host}/{target_port}/" and wishes "https://proxy.example.org/.well-known/masque/
to open a UDP proxying tunnel to target 192.0.2.42:443, it could send udp/{target_host}/{target_port}/" and wishes to open a UDP proxying
the following request: tunnel to target 192.0.2.42:443, it could send the following request:
CONNECT https://proxy.example.org/192.0.2.42/443/ HTTP/1.1 GET https://proxy.example.org/.well-known/masque/udp/192.0.2.42/443/ HTTP/1.1
Host: proxy.example.org Host: proxy.example.org
Connection: upgrade Connection: upgrade
Upgrade: connect-udp Upgrade: connect-udp
Figure 2: Example HTTP Request over HTTP/1.1 Figure 2: Example HTTP Request over HTTP/1.1
3.3. HTTP Response over HTTP/1.1 3.3. HTTP Response over HTTP/1.1
The proxy SHALL indicate a successful response by replying with the The proxy SHALL indicate a successful response by replying with the
following requirements: following requirements:
* the HTTP status code on the response SHALL be 101 (Switching * the HTTP status code on the response SHALL be 101 (Switching
Protocols). Protocols).
* the reponse SHALL include a single "Connection" header with value * the reponse SHALL include a single "Connection" header with value
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For example, if the client is configured with URI template For example, if the client is configured with URI template
"https://proxy.example.org/{target_host}/{target_port}/" and wishes "https://proxy.example.org/{target_host}/{target_port}/" and wishes
to open a UDP proxying tunnel to target 192.0.2.42:443, it could send to open a UDP proxying tunnel to target 192.0.2.42:443, it could send
the following request: the following request:
HEADERS HEADERS
:method = CONNECT :method = CONNECT
:protocol = connect-udp :protocol = connect-udp
:scheme = https :scheme = https
:path = /192.0.2.42/443/ :path = /.well-known/masque/udp/192.0.2.42/443/
:authority = proxy.example.org :authority = proxy.example.org
Figure 4: Example HTTP Request over HTTP/2 Figure 4: Example HTTP Request over HTTP/2
3.5. HTTP Response over HTTP/2 and HTTP/3 3.5. HTTP Response over HTTP/2 and HTTP/3
The proxy SHALL indicate a successful response by replying with any The proxy SHALL indicate a successful response by replying with any
2xx (Successful) HTTP status code, without any Transfer-Encoding or 2xx (Successful) HTTP status code, without any Transfer-Encoding or
Content-Length header fields. Content-Length header fields.
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it is possible for a context ID with the same numeric value to be it is possible for a context ID with the same numeric value to be
simultaneously assigned different semantics in distinct requests, simultaneously assigned different semantics in distinct requests,
potentially with different semantics. Context IDs MUST NOT be re- potentially with different semantics. Context IDs MUST NOT be re-
allocated within a given HTTP namespace but MAY be allocated in any allocated within a given HTTP namespace but MAY be allocated in any
order. Once allocated, any context ID can be used by both client and order. Once allocated, any context ID can be used by both client and
proxy - only allocation carries separate namespaces to avoid proxy - only allocation carries separate namespaces to avoid
requiring synchronization. requiring synchronization.
Registration is the action by which an endpoint informs its peer of Registration is the action by which an endpoint informs its peer of
the semantics and format of a given context ID. This document does the semantics and format of a given context ID. This document does
not define how registration occurs, though some examples of how it not define how registration occurs. Future extensions MAY use HTTP
might occur are provided in Appendix A. Depending on the method headers or capsules to register contexts. Depending on the method
being used, it is possible for datagrams to be received with Context being used, it is possible for datagrams to be received with Context
IDs which have not yet been registered, for instance due to IDs which have not yet been registered, for instance due to
reordering of the datagram and the registration packets during reordering of the datagram and the registration packets during
transmission. transmission.
5. HTTP Datagram Payload Format 5. HTTP Datagram Payload Format
When associated with UDP proxying request streams, the HTTP Datagram When associated with UDP proxying request streams, the HTTP Datagram
Payload field of HTTP Datagrams (see [HTTP-DGRAM]) has the format Payload field of HTTP Datagrams (see [HTTP-DGRAM]) has the format
defined in Figure 6. Note that when HTTP Datagrams are encoded using defined in Figure 6. Note that when HTTP Datagrams are encoded using
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8. IANA Considerations 8. IANA Considerations
8.1. HTTP Upgrade Token 8.1. HTTP Upgrade Token
This document will request IANA to register "connect-udp" in the HTTP This document will request IANA to register "connect-udp" in the HTTP
Upgrade Token Registry maintained at Upgrade Token Registry maintained at
<https://www.iana.org/assignments/http-upgrade-tokens>. <https://www.iana.org/assignments/http-upgrade-tokens>.
Value: connect-udp Value: connect-udp
Description: Proxying of UDP Payloads. Description: Proxying of UDP Payloads
Expected Version Tokens: None. Expected Version Tokens: None
Reference: This document
Reference: This document. 8.2. Well-Known URI
This document will request IANA to register "masque/udp" in the Well-
Known URIs Registry maintained at <https://www.iana.org/assignments/
well-known-uris/well-known-uris.xhtml>.
URI Suffix: masque/udp
Change Controller: IETF
Reference: This document
Status: permanent (if this document is approved)
Related Information: Includes all resources identified with the path
prefix "/.well-known/masque/udp/"
9. References 9. References
9.1. Normative References 9.1. Normative References
[DGRAM] Pauly, T., Kinnear, E., and D. Schinazi, "An Unreliable [DGRAM] Pauly, T., Kinnear, E., and D. Schinazi, "An Unreliable
Datagram Extension to QUIC", Work in Progress, Internet- Datagram Extension to QUIC", Work in Progress, Internet-
Draft, draft-ietf-quic-datagram-10, 4 February 2022, Draft, draft-ietf-quic-datagram-10, 4 February 2022,
<https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/draft-ietf-quic- <https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/draft-ietf-quic-
datagram-10>. datagram-10>.
skipping to change at page 12, line 49 skipping to change at page 13, line 25
[HTTP] Fielding, R. T., Nottingham, M., and J. Reschke, "HTTP [HTTP] Fielding, R. T., Nottingham, M., and J. Reschke, "HTTP
Semantics", Work in Progress, Internet-Draft, draft-ietf- Semantics", Work in Progress, Internet-Draft, draft-ietf-
httpbis-semantics-19, 12 September 2021, httpbis-semantics-19, 12 September 2021,
<https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/draft-ietf-httpbis- <https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/draft-ietf-httpbis-
semantics-19>. semantics-19>.
[HTTP-DGRAM] [HTTP-DGRAM]
Schinazi, D. and L. Pardue, "Using Datagrams with HTTP", Schinazi, D. and L. Pardue, "Using Datagrams with HTTP",
Work in Progress, Internet-Draft, draft-ietf-masque-h3- Work in Progress, Internet-Draft, draft-ietf-masque-h3-
datagram-06, 4 March 2022, datagram-07, 21 March 2022,
<https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/draft-ietf-masque- <https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/draft-ietf-masque-
h3-datagram-06>. h3-datagram-07>.
[QUIC] Iyengar, J., Ed. and M. Thomson, Ed., "QUIC: A UDP-Based [QUIC] Iyengar, J., Ed. and M. Thomson, Ed., "QUIC: A UDP-Based
Multiplexed and Secure Transport", RFC 9000, Multiplexed and Secure Transport", RFC 9000,
DOI 10.17487/RFC9000, May 2021, DOI 10.17487/RFC9000, May 2021,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc9000>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc9000>.
[RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119,
DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997, DOI 10.17487/RFC2119, March 1997,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc2119>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc2119>.
skipping to change at page 14, line 18 skipping to change at page 14, line 39
RFC 4443, DOI 10.17487/RFC4443, March 2006, RFC 4443, DOI 10.17487/RFC4443, March 2006,
<https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc4443>. <https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc4443>.
[PROXY-STATUS] [PROXY-STATUS]
Nottingham, M. and P. Sikora, "The Proxy-Status HTTP Nottingham, M. and P. Sikora, "The Proxy-Status HTTP
Response Header Field", Work in Progress, Internet-Draft, Response Header Field", Work in Progress, Internet-Draft,
draft-ietf-httpbis-proxy-status-08, 13 October 2021, draft-ietf-httpbis-proxy-status-08, 13 October 2021,
<https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/draft-ietf-httpbis- <https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/draft-ietf-httpbis-
proxy-status-08>. proxy-status-08>.
Appendix A. Example Extensions
Extensions can define new semantics for the payload of HTTP
Datagrams. The extension can then have an endpoint pick an available
locally-allocated context ID (see Section 4) and register that
context ID with their peer.
Note that this appendix only exists to help illustrate MASQUE Working
Group discussions while designing extensions. This appendix will be
removed before MASQUE Working Group Last Call.
A.1. Registering Contexts with Headers
Extensions can define a new HTTP header to register a context ID with
the peer endpoint.
As an example, take an extension that conveys the time at which a UDP
packet was received. The extension would first define the format of
its HTTP Datagram Payload field:
UDP with Timestamp HTTP Datagrams {
Context ID (i),
Timestamp (64),
UDP Payload (..),
}
Figure 7: Example: Format of UDP Payload with Timestamp
The extension would also define a new HTTP header (Example-UDP-
Timestamps) that includes a context ID value. Proxies that
understand this new HTTP header would be able to consequently handle
and parse datagrams with the context ID, while all other proxies
would silently drop the datagrams.
This specific extension would restrict registrations to the client,
and have them be bidirectional in the sense that the client
registering a context ID also indicates support for receiving on it.
Other extensions could allow proxy registrations, and/or
unidirectional registrations in the sense that registration would
only imply usage in one direction.
HEADERS
:method = CONNECT
:protocol = connect-udp
:scheme = https
:path = /192.0.2.42/443/
:authority = proxy.example.org
example-udp-timestamps = 42
Figure 8: Example: Registration via header
In this example request, HTTP Datagrams with context ID zero would
only contain the UDP payload, whereas HTTP Datagrams with context ID
42 would also contain a timestamp.
A.2. Registering Contexts with Capsules
Extensions can define a new Capsule type (see [HTTP-DGRAM]) to
register a context ID with the peer endpoint.
As an example, take an extension that compresses QUIC Connection IDs
when the client is running QUIC over a UDP proxying tunnel. The
extension would first define the transform applied to UDP payloads
when compressing and decompressing, such as removing the bytes of the
connection ID.
The extension would also define a new capsule type
(EXAMPLE_REGISTER_COMPRESSED_QUIC_CID) that includes a context ID
value and the connection ID to compress. Endpoints that understand
this new capsule type would be able to consequently handle and parse
datagrams on the context ID, while all other endpoints would ignore
the datagrams.
EXAMPLE_REGISTER_COMPRESSED_QUIC_CID Capsule {
Type (i) = EXAMPLE_REGISTER_COMPRESSED_QUIC_CID,
Length (i),
Context ID (i),
QUIC Connection ID (..),
}
Figure 9: Example: Registration via capsule
This example extension would most likely also define a new HTTP
header to indicate support.
Acknowledgments Acknowledgments
This document is a product of the MASQUE Working Group, and the This document is a product of the MASQUE Working Group, and the
author thanks all MASQUE enthusiasts for their contibutions. This author thanks all MASQUE enthusiasts for their contibutions. This
proposal was inspired directly or indirectly by prior work from many proposal was inspired directly or indirectly by prior work from many
people. In particular, the author would like to thank Eric Rescorla people. In particular, the author would like to thank Eric Rescorla
for suggesting to use an HTTP method to proxy UDP. Thanks to Lucas for suggesting to use an HTTP method to proxy UDP. Thanks to Lucas
Pardue for their inputs on this document. The extensibility design Pardue for their inputs on this document. The extensibility design
in this document came out of the HTTP Datagrams Design Team, whose in this document came out of the HTTP Datagrams Design Team, whose
members were Alan Frindell, Alex Chernyakhovsky, Ben Schwartz, Eric members were Alan Frindell, Alex Chernyakhovsky, Ben Schwartz, Eric
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