draft-ietf-bier-use-cases-01.txt   draft-ietf-bier-use-cases-02.txt 
Network Working Group N. Kumar Network Working Group N. Kumar
Internet-Draft R. Asati Internet-Draft R. Asati
Intended status: Informational Cisco Intended status: Informational Cisco
Expires: February 4, 2016 M. Chen Expires: July 29, 2016 M. Chen
X. Xu X. Xu
Huawei Huawei
A. Dolganow A. Dolganow
Alcatel-Lucent Alcatel-Lucent
T. Przygienda T. Przygienda
Ericsson Ericsson
A. Gulko A. Gulko
Thomson Reuters Thomson Reuters
D. Robinson D. Robinson
id3as-company Ltd id3as-company Ltd
V. Arya V. Arya
DirecTV Inc DirecTV Inc
August 3, 2015 C. Bestler
Nexenta
January 26, 2016
BIER Use Cases BIER Use Cases
draft-ietf-bier-use-cases-01.txt draft-ietf-bier-use-cases-02.txt
Abstract Abstract
Bit Index Explicit Replication (BIER) is an architecture that Bit Index Explicit Replication (BIER) is an architecture that
provides optimal multicast forwarding through a "BIER domain" without provides optimal multicast forwarding through a "BIER domain" without
requiring intermediate routers to maintain any multicast related per- requiring intermediate routers to maintain any multicast related per-
flow state. BIER also does not require any explicit tree-building flow state. BIER also does not require any explicit tree-building
protocol for its operation. A multicast data packet enters a BIER protocol for its operation. A multicast data packet enters a BIER
domain at a "Bit-Forwarding Ingress Router" (BFIR), and leaves the domain at a "Bit-Forwarding Ingress Router" (BFIR), and leaves the
BIER domain at one or more "Bit-Forwarding Egress Routers" (BFERs). BIER domain at one or more "Bit-Forwarding Egress Routers" (BFERs).
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This Internet-Draft will expire on February 4, 2016. This Internet-Draft will expire on July 29, 2016.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
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Table of Contents Table of Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. Specification of Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. Specification of Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3. BIER Use Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3. BIER Use Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.1. Multicast in L3VPN Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3.1. Multicast in L3VPN Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.2. BUM in EVPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3.2. BUM in EVPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.3. IPTV and OTT Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.3. IPTV and OTT Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.4. Multi-service, converged L3VPN network . . . . . . . . . 6 3.4. Multi-service, converged L3VPN network . . . . . . . . . 6
3.5. Control-plane simplification and SDN-controlled networks 7 3.5. Control-plane simplification and SDN-controlled networks 7
3.6. Data center Virtualization/Overlay . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.6. Data center Virtualization/Overlay . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.7. Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.7. Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3.8. 4k broadcast video services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.8. 4k broadcast video services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.9. Distributed Storage Cluster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
6. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
7. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 6. Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
7.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 7. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
7.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 7.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 7.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1. Introduction 1. Introduction
Bit Index Explicit Replication (BIER) [I-D.ietf-bier-architecture] is Bit Index Explicit Replication (BIER) [I-D.ietf-bier-architecture] is
an architecture that provides optimal multicast forwarding through a an architecture that provides optimal multicast forwarding through a
"BIER domain" without requiring intermediate routers to maintain any "BIER domain" without requiring intermediate routers to maintain any
multicast related per-flow state. BIER also does not require any multicast related per-flow state. BIER also does not require any
explicit tree-building protocol for its operation. A multicast data explicit tree-building protocol for its operation. A multicast data
packet enters a BIER domain at a "Bit-Forwarding Ingress Router" packet enters a BIER domain at a "Bit-Forwarding Ingress Router"
(BFIR), and leaves the BIER domain at one or more "Bit-Forwarding (BFIR), and leaves the BIER domain at one or more "Bit-Forwarding
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state. The obvious advantage with BIER is the low multicast state state. The obvious advantage with BIER is the low multicast state
maintained in the core and the faster convergence (which is typically maintained in the core and the faster convergence (which is typically
at par with the unicast convergence). The edge router at the content at par with the unicast convergence). The edge router at the content
source facility can act as BIFR router and the edge router at the source facility can act as BIFR router and the edge router at the
receiver facility can act as BFER routers. Any addition of a new receiver facility can act as BFER routers. Any addition of a new
content source or new satellite Terminal nodes can be added content source or new satellite Terminal nodes can be added
seamlessly in to the BEIR domain. The group membership from the seamlessly in to the BEIR domain. The group membership from the
receivers to the sources can be provisioned either by BGP or SDN receivers to the sources can be provisioned either by BGP or SDN
controller. controller.
3.9. Distributed Storage Cluster
Distributed Storage Clusters can benefit from dynamically targeted
multicast messaging both for dynamic load-balancing negotiations and
efficient concurrent replication of content to multiple targets.
For example, in the NexentaEdge storage cluster (by Nexenta Systems)
a Chunk Put transaction is accomplished with the following steps:
o The Client multicast a Chunk Put Request to a multicast group
known as a Negotiating Group. This group holds a small number of
storage targets that are collectively responsible for providing
storage for a stable subset of the chunks to be stored. In
NexentaEdge this is based upon a cryptographic hash of the Object
Name or the Chunk payload.
o Each recipient of the Chunk Put Request unicast a Chunk Put
Response to the Client indicating when it could accept a transfer
of the Chunk.
o The Client selects a different multicast group (a Rendezvous
Group) which will target the set storage targets selected to hold
the Chunk. This is a subset of the Negotiation Group, presumably
selected so as to complete the transfer as early as possible.
o >The Client multicast a Chunk Put Accept message to inform the
Negotiation Group of what storage targets have been selected, when
the transfer will occur and over what multicast group.
o The client performs the multicast transfer over the Rendezvous
Group at the agreed upon time.
o Each recipient sends a Chunk Put Ack to positively or negatively
acknowledge the chunk transfer.
o The client will retry the entire transaction as needed if there
are not yet sufficient replicas of the Chunk.
Chunks are retrieved by multicasting a Chunk Get Request to the same
Negotiating Group, collecting Chunk Get Responses, picking one source
from those responses, sending a Chunk Get Accept message to identify
the selected source and having the selected storage server unicast
the chunk to the source.
Chunks are found by the Object Name or by having the payload
cryptographic hash of payload chunks be recorded in a "chunk
reference" in a metadata chunk. The metadata chunks are found using
the Object Name.
The general pattern in use here, which should apply to other cluster
applications, is that multicast messages are sent amongst a
dynamically selected subset of the entire cluster, which may result
in exchanging further messages over a smaller subset even more
dynamically selected.
Currently the distributed storage application discussed use of MLD
managed IPV6 multicast groups. This in turn requires either a push-
based mechanism for dynamically configuring Rendezvous Groups or pre-
provisioning a very large number of potential Rendezvous Groups and
dynamically selecting the multicast group that will deliver to the
selected set of storage targets.
BIER would eliminate the need for a vast number of multicast groups.
The entire cluster can be represented as a single BIER domain using
only the default sub-domain. Each Negotiating Group is simply a
subset of the whole that is deterministically selected by the
Cryptographic Hash of the Object Name or Chunk Payload. Each
Rendezvous Group is a further subset of the Negotiating Group.
In a simple mapping of the MLD managed multicast groups, each
Negotiating Group could be represented by a short Bitstring selected
by a Set Identifier. The Set Indentier effectively becomes the
Negotiating Group. To address the entire Negotiating Group you set
the Bitstring to all ones. To later address a subset of the group a
subset Bitstring is used.
This allows a short fixed size BIER header to multicast to a very
large storage cluster.
4. Security Considerations 4. Security Considerations
There are no security issues introduced by this draft. There are no security issues introduced by this draft.
5. IANA Considerations 5. IANA Considerations
There are no IANA consideration introduced by this draft. There are no IANA consideration introduced by this draft.
6. Acknowledgments 6. Acknowledgments
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Email: Dom@id3as.co.uk Email: Dom@id3as.co.uk
Vishal Arya Vishal Arya
DirecTV Inc DirecTV Inc
2230 E Imperial Hwy 2230 E Imperial Hwy
CA 90245 CA 90245
USA USA
Email: varya@directv.com Email: varya@directv.com
Caitlin Bestler
Nexenta Systems
451 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA
US
Email: caitlin.bestler@nexenta.com
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