draft-ietf-bess-evpn-vpws-01.txt   draft-ietf-bess-evpn-vpws-02.txt 
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Dirk Steinberg Dirk Steinberg
Steinberg Consulting Steinberg Consulting
Thomas Beckhaus Thomas Beckhaus
Deutsche Telecom Deutsche Telecom
J. Rabadan J. Rabadan
Alcatel-Lucent Alcatel-Lucent
Expires: December 28, 2015 June 26, 2015 Expires: April 17, 2016 October 15, 2015
VPWS support in EVPN VPWS support in EVPN
draft-ietf-bess-evpn-vpws-01.txt draft-ietf-bess-evpn-vpws-02.txt
Abstract Abstract
This document describes how EVPN can be used to support virtual This document describes how EVPN can be used to support virtual
private wire service (VPWS) in MPLS/IP networks. EVPN enables the private wire service (VPWS) in MPLS/IP networks. EVPN enables the
following characteristics for VPWS: single-active as well as all- following characteristics for VPWS: single-active as well as all-
active multi-homing with flow-based load-balancing, eliminates the active multi-homing with flow-based load-balancing, eliminates the
need for single-segment and multi-segment PW signaling, and provides need for single-segment and multi-segment PW signaling, and provides
fast protection using data-plane prefix independent convergence upon fast protection using data-plane prefix independent convergence upon
node or link failure. node or link failure.
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to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must
include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
described in the Simplified BSD License. described in the Simplified BSD License.
Table of Contents Table of Contents
1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.1 Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.1 Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.2 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2. BGP Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 Service interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.1 EVPN Layer 2 attributes extended community . . . . . . . . . 7 2.1 VLAN-Based Service Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.2 VLAN Bundle Service Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4 EVPN Comparison to PW Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.2.1 Port-Based Service Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
5 ESI Bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.3 VLAN-Aware Bundle Service Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
6 Failure Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.4 Flexible CrossConnect Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
6.1 Single-Homed CEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 3. BGP Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
6.1 Multi-Homed CEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 3.1 EVPN Layer 2 attributes extended community . . . . . . . . . 9
7 VPWS with multiple sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 4 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
8 Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 5 EVPN Comparison to PW Signaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
9 Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 6 ESI Bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
10 IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 7 Failure Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
11 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 7.1 Single-Homed CEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
11.1 Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 7.2 Multi-Homed CEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
11.2 Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8 VPWS with multiple sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
9 Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
10 Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
11 IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
12 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
12.1 Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
12.2 Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1 Introduction 1 Introduction
This document describes how EVPN can be used to support virtual This document describes how EVPN can be used to support virtual
private wire service (VPWS) in MPLS/IP networks. The use of EVPN private wire service (VPWS) in MPLS/IP networks. The use of EVPN
mechanisms for VPWS brings the benefits of EVPN to p2p services. mechanisms for VPWS brings the benefits of EVPN to p2p services.
These benefits include single-active redundancy as well as all-active These benefits include single-active redundancy as well as all-active
redundancy with flow-based load-balancing. Furthermore, the use of redundancy with flow-based load-balancing. Furthermore, the use of
EVPN for VPWS eliminates the need for signaling single-segment and EVPN for VPWS eliminates the need for signaling single-segment and
multi-segment PWs for p2p Ethernet services. multi-segment PWs for p2p Ethernet services.
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6. A given access trunk could have hundreds of EVPL services, and a 6. A given access trunk could have hundreds of EVPL services, and a
given PE could have thousands of EVPLs configured. It must be given PE could have thousands of EVPLs configured. It must be
possible to configure multiple EVPL services within the same EVI. possible to configure multiple EVPL services within the same EVI.
7. Local access circuits configured to belong to a given EVPN 7. Local access circuits configured to belong to a given EVPN
instance could also belong to different physical access trunks. instance could also belong to different physical access trunks.
8. EPL-LAN and EVP-LAN are possible on the same system and also ESIs 8. EPL-LAN and EVP-LAN are possible on the same system and also ESIs
can be shared between EVPL and EVP-LANs. can be shared between EVPL and EVP-LANs.
2. BGP Extensions 2 Service interface
2.1 VLAN-Based Service Interface
With this service interface, a VPWS instance identifier corresponds
to only a single VLAN on a specific interface. Therefore, there is a
one-to-one mapping between a VID on this interface and the VPWS
service instance identifier. The PE provides the cross-connect
functionality between MPLS LSP identified by the VPWS service
instance identifier and a specific <port,VLAN>. If the VLAN is
represented by different VIDs on different PEs. (e.g., a different
VID per Ethernet segment per PE), then each PE needs to perform VID
translation for frames destined to its Ethernet segment. In such
scenarios, the Ethernet frames transported over an MPLS/IP network
SHOULD remain tagged with the originating VID, and a VID translation
MUST be supported in the data path and MUST be performed on the
disposition PE.
2.2 VLAN Bundle Service Interface
With this service interface, a VPWS service instance identifier
corresponds to multiple VLANs on a specific interface. The PE
provides the cross-connect functionality between MPLS LSP identified
by the VPWS service instance identifier and a group of VLANs on a
specific interface. For this service interface, each VLAN is
presented by a single VID which means no VLAN translation is allowed.
The receiving PE, can direct the traffic based on EVPN label alone to
a specific port. The transmitting PE can corss connect traffic from a
group of VLANs on a specific port to the MPLS LSP. The MPLS-
encapsulated frames MUST remain tagged with the originating VID.
2.2.1 Port-Based Service Interface
This service interface is a special case of the VLAN bundle service
interface, where all of the VLANs on the port are mapped to the same
VPWS service instance identifier. The procedures are identical to
those described in Section 6.2.
2.3 VLAN-Aware Bundle Service Interface Contrary to EVPN, in EVPN-VPWS
this service interface maps to VLAN-based service interface (defined
in section 6.1) and thus this service interface is not used in EVPN-
VPWS. In other words, if one tries to define data-plane and control
plane behavior for this service interface, he would realize that it
is the same as that of VLAN-based service.
2.4 Flexible CrossConnect Service This service provides the ultimate
flexibility at the expense of additional lookup. With this EVPN-VPWS
service a large number of attachments circuits (ACs), each of which
represented by either single VLAN tag or double VLAN tags (QinQ)
across multiple endpoints, are multiplexed in a single EVPN-VPWS
service instance. An endpoint can be a physical interface, VSI, an
IP-VRF, a MAC-VRF, or any other endpoint where cross-connection of
the associated AC is desired. Because in this service mode,
aggregation is performed across multiple endpoints, besides MPLS
label, an additional VLAN ID lookup (either single tag or double tag)
needs to be performed at the disposition PE in order to identify the
destination endpoint. One can think of this as, the EVPN label
identifies a cross-connect table and then a single tag (or double
tag) lookup is performed to identify the endpoint. Each cross-connect
table has its own unique VLAN space which mean it can have upto 4K
single-tag VLAN (or upto 16M double-tag VLANs). VLAN IDs can be
overlap across different cross-connect tables but MUST be unique
within a table.
The EVPN label besides identifying the cross-connect table, also
identifies the following types of VID look-ups: Single VID lookup:
The disposition PE MUST support single VID lookup where upon outer-
VID lookup, the destination end-point is identified. Double VID
lookup: The disposition PE MUST support double VID lookup where upon
outer most two VIDs lookup, the destination end-point is identified.
Wildcard VID Lookup: The disposition PE MAY support special double
VID lookup where the first VID is outer most VID and the 2nd VID is
the wild card (*).
If no entry is found upon the lookup, a counter per cross-connect
table is incremented. Upon finding an entry and identifying the
destination endpoint, the packet is forwarded to that destination
endpoint. Any further tag manipulation such as re-write (single or
double), addition, deletion (single or double) will be performed at
the endpoint.
On the imposition PE, by associating an attachment circuit to an
EVPN-VPWS service instance ID, we basically associate that attachment
circuit with the corresponding cross-connect table.
Since VID lookup (single or double) needs to be performed at the
disposition PE, then VID normalization MUST be performed prior to the
MPLS encapsulation on the ingress PE. This requires that both
imposition and disposition PE devices be capable of VLAN tag
manipulation, such as re-write (single or double), addition, deletion
(single or double), at their endpoints (e.g., their physical
interfaces).
3. BGP Extensions
This document proposes the use of the Ethernet A-D per EVI route to This document proposes the use of the Ethernet A-D per EVI route to
signal VPWS services. The Ethernet Segment Identifier field is set to signal VPWS services. The Ethernet Segment Identifier field is set to
the customer ES and the Ethernet Tag ID 32-bit field is set to the the customer ES and the Ethernet Tag ID 32-bit field is set to the
24-bit VPWS service instance identifier. For both EPL and EVPL 24-bit VPWS service instance identifier. For both EPL and EVPL
services, for a given VPWS service instance the pair of PEs services, for a given VPWS service instance the pair of PEs
instantiating that VPWS service instance will each advertise an instantiating that VPWS service instance will each advertise an
Ethernet A-D per EVI route with its VPWS service instance identifier Ethernet A-D per EVI route with its VPWS service instance identifier
and will each be configured with the other PE's VPWS service instance and will each be configured with the other PE's VPWS service instance
identifier. When each PE has received the other PE's Ethernet A-D per identifier. When each PE has received the other PE's Ethernet A-D per
EVI route the VPWS service instance is instantiated. It should be EVI route the VPWS service instance is instantiated. It should be
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configured on both PEs. configured on both PEs.
The Route-Target (RT) extended community with which the Ethernet A-D The Route-Target (RT) extended community with which the Ethernet A-D
per EVI route is tagged identifies the EVPN instance in which the per EVI route is tagged identifies the EVPN instance in which the
VPWS service instance is configured. It is the operator's choice as VPWS service instance is configured. It is the operator's choice as
to how many and which VPWS service instances are configured in a to how many and which VPWS service instances are configured in a
given EVPN instance. However, a given EVPN instance MUST NOT be given EVPN instance. However, a given EVPN instance MUST NOT be
configured with both VPWS service instances and standard EVPN multi- configured with both VPWS service instances and standard EVPN multi-
point services. point services.
2.1 EVPN Layer 2 attributes extended community 3.1 EVPN Layer 2 attributes extended community
This draft proposes a new extended community, defined below, to be This draft proposes a new extended community, defined below, to be
included with Ethernet A-D per EVI route. included with Ethernet A-D per EVI route. This attribute is mandatory
if multihoming is enabled.
+------------------------------------+ +------------------------------------+
| Type(0x06)/Sub-type(TBD)(2 octet) | | Type(0x06)/Sub-type(TBD)(2 octet) |
+------------------------------------+ +------------------------------------+
| Control Flags (2 octets) | | Control Flags (2 octets) |
+------------------------------------+ +------------------------------------+
| L2 MTU (2 octets) | | L2 MTU (2 octets) |
+------------------------------------+ +------------------------------------+
| Reserved (2 octets) | | Reserved (2 octets) |
+------------------------------------+ +------------------------------------+
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| MBZ |C|E|T|R|P|B| (MBZ = MUST Be Zero) | MBZ |C|P|B| (MBZ = MUST Be Zero)
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
The following bits in the Control Flags are defined; the remaining The following bits in the Control Flags are defined; the remaining
bits MUST be set to zero when sending and MUST be ignored when bits MUST be set to zero when sending and MUST be ignored when
receiving this community. receiving this community.
Name Meaning Name Meaning
P If set to 1 in multihoming single active scenarios, it P If set to 1 in multihoming single active scenarios, it
indicates that the advertising PE is the Primary PE. indicates that the advertising PE is the Primary PE.
SHOULD be set to 1 for multihoming all active scenarios.
B If set to 1 in multihoming single active scenarios, it B If set to 1 in multihoming single active scenarios, it
indicates that the advertising PE is the Backup PE. indicates that the advertising PE is the Backup PE.
T If set to 1, the PE is requesting the ability
to send an EVPN VPWS packet that includes a flow label.
R If set to 1, the PE is able to receive an EVPN
packet with a flow label present.
E If set to 1, the PE is able of sending and receiving
Entropy label.
C If set to 1, a Control word [RFC 4448] MUST be present C If set to 1, a Control word [RFC 4448] MUST be present
when sending EVPN packets to this PE. when sending EVPN packets to this PE.
The combination of entropy label (E bit set) enabled and control word A received L2 MTU=0 means no MTU checking against local MTU is
(C bit set) required is invalid. However the combination of control needed. A received non-zero MTU SHOULD be checked against local MTU
word required (C bit set) and flow label transmit (T bit set) and/or and if there is a mismatch, the local PE MUST not add the remote PE
flow label receive (R bit set) is valid. as the EVPN destination for corresponding VPWS service instance.
For Entropy label handling, the transmitting PE knows whether the The usage of the Per ES Ethernet AD route is unchanged from its usage
receiving PE can support Entropy label or not. So, if receiving PE in [RFC7432], i.e. the "Single-Active" bit in the flags of the ESI
cannot support it, then the transmitting PE MUST not send Entropy Label extended community will indicate if single active or all active
label. redundancy is used for this ES.
3 Operation In multihoming single active scenario, a remote PE receiving P=1 from
more than one PE will select only one primary PE when forwarding
traffic. A remote PE receiving B=1 from more than one PE will select
only one backup PE. A remote PE MUST receive P=1 from at least one PE
before forwarding traffic.
As per [RFC6790], if a network uses entropy labels then the control
word (C bit set) SHOULD not be used when sending EVPN-encapsulated
packets over a P2P LSP.
4 Operation
The following figure shows an example of a P2P service deployed with The following figure shows an example of a P2P service deployed with
EVPN. EVPN.
Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet
Native |<--------- EVPN Instance ----------->| Native Native |<--------- EVPN Instance ----------->| Native
Service | | Service Service | | Service
(AC) | |<-PSN1->| |<-PSN2->| | (AC) (AC) | |<-PSN1->| |<-PSN2->| | (AC)
| V V V V V V | | V V V V V V |
| +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ | | +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ +-----+ |
+----+ | | PE1 |======|ASBR1|==|ASBR2|===| PE3 | | +----+ +----+ | | PE1 |======|ASBR1|==|ASBR2|===| PE3 | | +----+
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The VPWS service instance identifier encoded in the Ethernet Tag The VPWS service instance identifier encoded in the Ethernet Tag
field in an advertised Ethernet A-D per EVI route MUST either be field in an advertised Ethernet A-D per EVI route MUST either be
unique across all ASs, or an ASBR needs to perform a translation when unique across all ASs, or an ASBR needs to perform a translation when
the Ethernet A-D per EVI route is re-advertised by the ASBR from one the Ethernet A-D per EVI route is re-advertised by the ASBR from one
AS to the other AS. AS to the other AS.
Ethernet A-D per ES route can be used for mass withdraw to withdraw Ethernet A-D per ES route can be used for mass withdraw to withdraw
all Ethernet A-D per EVI routes associated with the multi-home site all Ethernet A-D per EVI routes associated with the multi-home site
on a given PE. on a given PE.
4 EVPN Comparison to PW Signaling 5 EVPN Comparison to PW Signaling
In EVPN, service endpoint discovery and label signaling are done In EVPN, service endpoint discovery and label signaling are done
concurrently using BGP. Whereas, with VPWS based on [RFC4448], label concurrently using BGP. Whereas, with VPWS based on [RFC4448], label
signaling is done via LDP and service endpoint discovery is either signaling is done via LDP and service endpoint discovery is either
through manual provisioning or through BGP. through manual provisioning or through BGP.
In existing implementation of VPWS using pseudowires(PWs), redundancy In existing implementation of VPWS using pseudowires(PWs), redundancy
is limited to single-active mode, while with EVPN implementation of is limited to single-active mode, while with EVPN implementation of
VPWS both single-active and all-active redundancy modes can be VPWS both single-active and all-active redundancy modes can be
supported. supported.
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Upon link or node failure, EVPN can trigger failover with the Upon link or node failure, EVPN can trigger failover with the
withdrawal of a single BGP route per EVPL service or multiple EVPL withdrawal of a single BGP route per EVPL service or multiple EVPL
services, whereas with VPWS PW redundancy, the failover sequence services, whereas with VPWS PW redundancy, the failover sequence
requires exchange of two control plane messages: one message to requires exchange of two control plane messages: one message to
deactivate the group of primary PWs and a second message to activate deactivate the group of primary PWs and a second message to activate
the group of backup PWs associated with the access link. Finally, the group of backup PWs associated with the access link. Finally,
EVPN may employ data plane local repair mechanisms not available in EVPN may employ data plane local repair mechanisms not available in
VPWS. VPWS.
5 ESI Bandwidth 6 ESI Bandwidth
The ESI Bandwidth will be encoded using the Link Bandwidth Extended The ESI Bandwidth will be encoded using the Link Bandwidth Extended
community defined in [draft-ietf-idr-link-bandwidth] and associated community defined in [draft-ietf-idr-link-bandwidth] and associated
with the Ethernet AD route used to realize the EVPL services. with the Ethernet AD route used to realize the EVPL services.
When a PE receives this attribute for a given EVPL it MUST request When a PE receives this attribute for a given EVPL it MUST request
the required bandwidth from the PSN towards the other EVPL service the required bandwidth from the PSN towards the other EVPL service
destination PE originating the message. When resources are allocated destination PE originating the message. When resources are allocated
from the PSN for a given EVPL service, then the PSN SHOULD account from the PSN for a given EVPL service, then the PSN SHOULD account
for the Bandwidth requested by this EVPL service. for the Bandwidth requested by this EVPL service.
In the case where PSN resources are not available, the PE receiving In the case where PSN resources are not available, the PE receiving
this attribute MUST re-send its local Ethernet AD routes for this this attribute MUST re-send its local Ethernet AD routes for this
EVPL service with the ESI Bandwidth = All FFs to declare that the EVPL service with the ESI Bandwidth = All FFs to declare that the
"PSN Resources Unavailable". "PSN Resources Unavailable".
The scope of the ESI Bandwidth is limited to only one Autonomous The scope of the ESI Bandwidth is limited to only one Autonomous
System. System.
6 Failure Scenarios 7 Failure Scenarios
On a link or port failure between the CE and the PE for both single On a link or port failure between the CE and the PE for both single
and multi-homed CEs, the PE must withdraw all the associated Ethernet and multi-homed CEs, the PE must withdraw all the associated Ethernet
AD routes for the VPWS service instances on the failed port or link. AD routes for the VPWS service instances on the failed port or link.
6.1 Single-Homed CEs 7.1 Single-Homed CEs
Unlike [EVPN], EVPN-VPWS uses Ethernet AD route advertisements for Unlike [EVPN], EVPN-VPWS uses Ethernet AD route advertisements for
single-homed Ethernet Segments. Therefore, upon a link/port failure single-homed Ethernet Segments. Therefore, upon a link/port failure
of this single-homed Ethernet Segment, the PE MUST withdraw the of this single-homed Ethernet Segment, the PE MUST withdraw the
associated Ethernet A-D routes. associated Ethernet A-D routes.
6.1 Multi-Homed CEs 7.2 Multi-Homed CEs
For a faster convergence in multi-homed scenarios with either Single- For a faster convergence in multi-homed scenarios with either Single-
Active Redundancy or All-active redundancy, mass withdraw technique Active Redundancy or All-active redundancy, mass withdraw technique
as per [EVPN] baseline is used. A PE previously advertising an as per [EVPN] baseline is used. A PE previously advertising an
Ethernet A-D per ES route, can withdraw this route signaling to the Ethernet A-D per ES route, can withdraw this route signaling to the
remote PEs to switch all the VPWS service instances associated with remote PEs to switch all the VPWS service instances associated with
this multi-homed ES to the backup PE this multi-homed ES to the backup PE
7 VPWS with multiple sites 8 VPWS with multiple sites
The VPWS among multiple sites (full mesh of P2P connections - one per The VPWS among multiple sites (full mesh of P2P connections - one per
pair of sites) that can be setup automatically without any explicit pair of sites) that can be setup automatically without any explicit
provisioning of P2P connections among the sites is outside the scope provisioning of P2P connections among the sites is outside the scope
of this document. of this document.
8 Acknowledgements 9 Acknowledgements
The authors would like to acknowledge Wen Lin and Nitin Singh The authors would like to acknowledge Wen Lin, Nitin Singh, Senthil
contributions to this document. Sathappan and Vinod Prabhu for their feedback and contributions to
this document.
9 Security Considerations 10 Security Considerations
This document does not introduce any additional security constraints. This document does not introduce any additional security constraints.
10 IANA Considerations 11 IANA Considerations
Definition of 2 new flags in the control flags of the Layer 2 Allocation of Extended Community Type and Sub-Type for EVPN L2
extended community described in [RFC4761] as per section 2.1. attributes.
11 References 12 References
11.1 Normative References 12.1 Normative References
[KEYWORDS] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate [KEYWORDS] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
11.2 Informative References 12.2 Informative References
[RFC7209] A. Sajassi, R. Aggarwal et. al., "Requirements for Ethernet [RFC7209] A. Sajassi, R. Aggarwal et. al., "Requirements for Ethernet
VPN". VPN".
[RFC7432] A. Sajassi, R. Aggarwal et. al., "BGP MPLS Based Ethernet [RFC7432] A. Sajassi, R. Aggarwal et. al., "BGP MPLS Based Ethernet
VPN". VPN".
[PBB-EVPN] A. Sajassi et. al., "PBB-EVPN", draft-ietf-l2vpn-pbb-evpn- [PBB-EVPN] A. Sajassi et. al., "PBB-EVPN", draft-ietf-l2vpn-pbb-evpn-
08.txt. 08.txt.
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